Making the macarons.

Few pastries require as many egg whites as Macarons. Good egg whites, too.

From local chickens whose care and feeding manifest in the bright orange of a nurtured yolk. While there isn’t as much visual difference between a nurtured egg white and an anemic, grocery store one, I assume this nutritional superiority carries through to the transparent part of the egg, too. 

 Our first batch of single-origin chocolate macarons, color coded with luster dust to match the Washi tape found on our bar packaging. At our commercial kitchen, Omfk. May 7, 2018. Photo Credit: Will Dixon.   

Our first batch of single-origin chocolate macarons, color coded with luster dust to match the Washi tape found on our bar packaging. At our commercial kitchen, Omfk. May 7, 2018. Photo Credit: Will Dixon.

 

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 Cornelia, prepping the ganache. She needed vodka for the luster dust. At our commercial kitchen, Omfk. May 7, 2018. Photo Credit: Callie Neylan.

Cornelia, prepping the ganache. She needed vodka for the luster dust. At our commercial kitchen, Omfk. May 7, 2018. Photo Credit: Callie Neylan.

Cornelia is at Omfk. as I type, piping Macarons by now, squeezing chocolate worthy of those delicious eggs between two pale blue, chewy shells. Delicate ruffled cakes that serve as cushions for her single-origin ganache. I met Cornelia at a food writing class at The Pantry, which is how this whole collaboration began. She's a pastry chef at the Pacific Northwest's renowned restaurant, The Herbfarm. It was her idea to make macarons with our chocolate, and my idea to sell them as flights.

Macarons—the cousins of macaroons, the lumpy, coconut-based affairs—are airy where cupcakes are dense, dainty where cupcakes are messy, fancy where cupcakes are homey. They are beautiful and haughty and ethereal. They are high-maintenance, and have managed to make that part of their appeal. They are the Gwyneth Paltrow of desserts, basically. – Megan Garber

I wrote an article for ARCADE once, mulling over how Will and I, both with software backgrounds, use software development methodologies to run (or,maybe more aptly, experiment with) Bellflower. Bringing scrum and Agile processes to Bellflower, lending a semblance of order to an inheritantly chaotic and ambiguous endeavor: building a company from the ground up. 

So in April, Cornelia brought the test macarons, tinted Bellflower blue. We tasted, we liked, and then, over coffee and buttered croissants one early morning at Sea Wolf, we hammered out the pricing and profit-sharing details and said let's do it! Can we ship something for Mother’s Day? By scoping the initial production batch to a small number (i.e.,the maximum capacity my 6-quart Kitchen Aid stand mixer could produce) and scoping our packaging design to ready-made boxes and simple labels that could be printed on my home printer, we were able to move fast. For Mother’s Day 2018, we gave Seattle its first flight of single-origin chocolate macarons *. 

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 Final macaron packaging, at least for this MVP batch. At Omfk., May 11, 2018.

Final macaron packaging, at least for this MVP batch. At Omfk., May 11, 2018.

* Curses! It turns out that Dandelion did it first.